Doug Aitken - Altered Earth - 2012.

Georges Lepape, ’Des Ombrelles' 1913.

Georges Lepape, ’Des Ombrelles' 1913.

Installation at the Szépművészeti Múzeum.

Dirck van Delen, ‘Beeldenstorm in een kerk’, 1630.

Philip Johnson with Craig Kauffman 

This little guy!

Gaspard Félix Tournachon Nadar. Interior of Le Géant Inflating, 1863.

ourpresidents:

Today marks the 90th anniversary of the first time the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was introduced in Congress in 1923. Both Gerald and Betty Ford were strong supporters of this constitutional amendment that stated, “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”

When the ERA was again introduced in the early 1970s, Congressman Ford voted in favor of it. Just over 30 states had ratified the amendment by the time he entered the White House. As President, Ford urged “those States who have not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment to give serious consideration to its ratification and the upholding of our Nation’s heritage.” He hoped that the requisite goal of ratification by 38 states would be reached in the Bicentennial year of 1976.

First Lady Betty Ford staunchly and vocally supported the ERA. “It is my personal opinion that ratification of the ERA is the single most important step that our nation can take to extend equal opportunity to all Americans,” she said.

Here is one of her statements explaining why she was firmly in favor of this amendment.

Photo: First Lady Betty Ford Expressing her support for the Equal Rights Amendment in Hollywood, Florida. 2/25/75.

-from the Ford Library

uncertaintimes:

The only known live-posed portrait of Georgius Everhardus Rumphius was drawn by his son, Paulus Augustus, between October 1695 and July 1696 on Ambon. The governor at the time wrote the encomium, which translates, “Though he be blind, his mental eyes are so sharp that no one can best him at inquiry or discernment. Rumphius is a German by birth but his loyalty and pen are completely Dutch. Let the work say the rest.” This image appeared in the 1999 Yale University Press book, The Ambonese Curiosity Cabinet.
The Herbal of Rumphius, the blind seer of Ambon

uncertaintimes:

The only known live-posed portrait of Georgius Everhardus Rumphius was drawn by his son, Paulus Augustus, between October 1695 and July 1696 on Ambon. The governor at the time wrote the encomium, which translates, “Though he be blind, his mental eyes are so sharp that no one can best him at inquiry or discernment. Rumphius is a German by birth but his loyalty and pen are completely Dutch. Let the work say the rest.” This image appeared in the 1999 Yale University Press book, The Ambonese Curiosity Cabinet.

The Herbal of Rumphius, the blind seer of Ambon

artwordcontent:

Bound. Whyn Lewis.

artwordcontent:

Bound. Whyn Lewis.