That time when Arthur Miller, Carson McCullers, Marilyn Monroe, and Isak Dinesen luncheoned together on oysters, white grapes, soufflé, and champagne after which the latter three commenced to dance on top of the table.

awesomepeoplereading:

Tesla reads, appears in trick photograph.

The notion that work is an irreversible process ending in a static icon-object no longer has much relevance. This reclamation of process refocuses art as an energy driving to change perception… What is revealed is that art itself is an activity of change, of disorientation and shift, of violent discontinuity and mutability, of the willingness for confusion even in the service of discovering new perceptual modes.
Robert Morris, Notes on Sculpture, Part 4 (via heathwest)
And all times are one time, and all those dead in the past never lived before our definition gives them life, and out of the shadow their eyes implore us.
Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men.
I got an image in my head that never got out. We see a great many things and can remember a great many things, but that is different. We get very few of the true images in our heads of the kind I am talking about, the kind that become more and more vivid for us as if the passage of the years did not obscure their reality but, year by year, drew off another veil to expose a meaning which we had only dimly surmised at first. Very probably the last veil will not be removed, for there are not enough years, but the brightness of the image increases and our conviction increases that the brightness is meaning, or the legend of meaning, and without the image our lives would be nothing except an old piece of film rolled on a spool and thrown into a desk drawer among the unanswered letters.
― Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men
After a great blow, or crisis, after the first shock and then after the nerves have stopped screaming and twitching, you settle down to the new condition of things and feel that all possibility of change has been used up. You adjust yourself, and are sure that the new equilibrium is for eternity… But if anything is certain it is that no story is ever over, for the story which we think is over is only a chapter in a story which will not be over, and it isn’t the game that is over, it is just an inning, and that game has a lot more than nine innings. When the game stops it will be called on account of darkness. But it is a long day.
Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men.
There was once a witch who desired to know everything. But the wiser a witch is, the harder she knocks her head against the wall when she comes to it. Her name was Watho, and she had a wolf in her mind. She cared for nothing in itself — only for knowing it. She was not naturally cruel, but the wolf had made her cruel. She was tall and graceful, with a white skin, red hair, and black eyes, which had a red fire in them. She was straight and strong, but now and then would fall bent together, shudder, and sit for a moment with her head turned over her shoulder, as if the wolf had got out of her mind onto her back.
George MacDonald, The Day Boy and the Night Girl.
When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you’ll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?
― C.S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces.
Eduardo Paolozzi.

Eduardo Paolozzi.

Eduardo Paolozzi’s Laocoon.

Wilhelm Höpfner’s amphibian take on the Laocoon is one of my favorites.

Paolozzi’s Newton, after Blake.

Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, History of Nothing, 1962.